Amy Schumer, everybody’s favorite comedian, called out a teenage film critic who posted a gross tweet about her yesterday. 17-year-old Jackson Murphy, met Schumer and took a picture with her. Later, he posted a tweet that read, “Spent the night with @amyschumer. Certainly not the first guy to write that.”

Ew.

After she saw the tweet, Schumer replied, “I get it. Cause I’m a whore? Glad I took a photo with you. Hi to your dad.”

Murphy later apologized for his words, writing, “I truly apologize. Thought you’d like the joke. I should leave the comedy to you! Thanks for the photo. Glad you won last night!” He apologized again later.

The exchange between the two ended largely amicably; after seeing his second apology, Schumer wrote, “That’s really okay honey. I just remember thinking you and your dad were sweet and it was a bummer to read that.”

But while the story ended on okay terms with them, tons of grown men who had no business in the conversation leapt to Murphy’s aid, defending what he said and criticizing Schumer for being unable to take a joke. Most of them spoke up (so bravely) to say that because Schumer’s “entire career is based on her alleged promiscuity. How is that not fair game to joke about that?”

Let us count the ways!

Firstly, Murphy is a minor, so suggesting Schumer had relations with someone underage is pretty gross; second, Jackson’s tweet was a lie; third, Schumer’s personal life is only something Schumer gets to joke about; fourth, Murphy’s words carried more weight than he realized. The fact that so many grown men jumped to his defense proves it. Schumer does make jokes about her promiscuity, but when she does it, she controls her own narrative. She has a right to speak on her own behalf.

Twitter men don’t.

It’s important than Schumer called out the joke that could so easily have gone ignored. It’s the same kind of joke that people make every day, ones that don’t get any attention—they’re just part of our social fabric. This is the kind of sexist language allowed in our everyday spaces and it needs to be called out wherever it lives.

About 

Mary Summers is a recent college grad and freelance writer residing in the Pacific Northwest. She loves writing about trending topics, health and beauty advice, music, film, and television.