healthy skin mud mask facial

Facials are an important part of keeping your skin healthy. Image: The Style PA via flickr CC.

Facials are an important part of keeping your skin healthy. They provide hydration, professional exfoliation and even stress relief. Here are a few pointers to make sure you get the most out of your facial experience, whether it’s your very first one or your first one this month!

  • Avoid exfoliating yourself four days prior to facial. A facial will include many parts of exfoliation like microdermabrasion or an enzyme peel. You don’t want to make your skin hypersensitive before your skin appointment. It’s best to avoid any scrubs or retinol products in the days leading up to your treatment. If your skin is irritated or burned, be sure to reschedule your appointment for a later time when it has healed.
  • Turn off your cell phone. If your cell phone starts ringing in the middle of your treatment, it’s disruptive not only to you but the aesthetician. Make sure your phone is off completely and not just on vibrate. Think of it as a great time to disconnect and have a full hour of much-deserved “me time.”
  • Perform your regular day-to-day skincare routine. Some people think they need to show up to a facial with clean skin while others show up in full makeup. The best thing is for your aesthetician to see your complexion as is so they can properly assess its oil buildup and hydration levels. Show up having performed your normal routine, and sans makeup if you feel comfortable doing so.
  • Do be sure to bring your skin concerns. There is usually a consultation prior to your facial treatment and you need to make sure you bring your top three skin concerns to your aesthetician. It’s important to isolate the highest priority opens and communicate them well. This helps to customize the facial so they can treat those concerns, which will pay off for you and your skincare rituals in the long run.

About 

Sarah is a freelance writer with a wide variety of interests, including international relations, politics, education, humanitarianism, women's rights, yoga, mental and physical health, and natural remedies.